boil

I UK [bɔɪl] / US verb
Word forms "boil":
present tense I/you/we/they boil he/she/it boils present participle boiling past tense boiled past participle boiled
*
1)
a) [intransitive/transitive] if a liquid boils, or if you boil it, it becomes so hot that there are bubbles in it and it starts to become a gas

When the water boils, add the rice.

Boil some milk in a pan.

put something on to boil (= put liquid in a container and heat it until it boils):

She put two pans of soup on to boil.

b) if a container boils, or if you boil it, the liquid in it boils

He stood in the kitchen waiting for the pan to boil.

I'll just boil the kettle and we can have some tea.

boil dry (= boil until there is no liquid left):

The saucepan had boiled dry and the carrots were burnt.

2) [transitive] to cook food in water that is boiling

How long does it take to boil an egg?

a) [intransitive] to be cooked in water that is boiling

The pasta needs to boil for 10 minutes.

put something on to boil (= start to cook something in hot water):

Can you put the vegetables on to boil, please?

b) [transitive] to wash clothes in water that is boiling
3) [intransitive] to feel something such as anger very strongly

James felt the fury boiling within him.

boil with rage/anger:

Boiling with rage, Kate slammed the car door and drove off.

Phrasal verbs:
See:
blood

II UK [bɔɪl] / US noun [countable]
Word forms "boil":
singular boil plural boils
a painful lump on your skin that has become infected and is filled with pus (= an unpleasant yellow liquid)

English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • boil — n *abscess, furuncle, carbuncle, pimple, pustule boil vb Boil, seethe, simmer, parboil, stew mean to prepare (as food) in a liquid heated to the point where it emits considerable steam. Boil implies the bubbling of the liquid and the rapid escape …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Boil — Boil, v. t. 1. To heat to the boiling point, or so as to cause ebullition; as, to boil water. [1913 Webster] 2. To form, or separate, by boiling or evaporation; as, to boil sugar or salt. [1913 Webster] 3. To subject to the action of heat in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Boil — or furuncle is a skin disease caused by the infection of hair follicles, resulting in the localized accumulation of pus and dead tissue. Individual boils can cluster together and form an interconnected network of boils called carbuncles. In… …   Wikipedia

  • boil — boil; boil·er; boil·er·less; boil·ery; gar·boil; par·boil; re·boil; re·boil·er; boil·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • boil — boil1 [boil] vi. [ME boilen < OFr boillir < L bullire < bulla, a bubble, knob; prob. < IE * bu , var. of echoic base * beu , * bheu , to blow up, cause to swell] 1. to bubble up and vaporize over direct heat 2. to reach the vaporizing …   English World dictionary

  • Boil — (boil), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Boiled} (boild); p. pr. & vb. n. {Boiling}.] [OE. boilen, OF. boilir, builir, F. bouillir, fr. L. bullire to be in a bubbling motion, from bulla bubble; akin to Gr. ?, Lith. bumbuls. Cf. {Bull} an edict, {Budge}, v.,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Boil — Boil, n. [Influenced by boil, v. See {Beal}, {Bile}.] A hard, painful, inflamed tumor, which, on suppuration, discharges pus, mixed with blood, and discloses a small fibrous mass of dead tissue, called the core. [1913 Webster] {A blind boil}, one …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • boil — ‘large spot’ [OE] and boil ‘vaporize with heat’ [13] are distinct words. The former comes from Old English byl or byle, which became bile in Middle English; the change to boil started in the 15th century, perhaps from association with the verb.… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • boil — Ⅰ. boil [1] ► VERB 1) (with reference to a liquid) reach or cause to reach the temperature at which it bubbles and turns to vapour. 2) (with reference to food) cook or be cooked by immersing in boiling water. 3) seethe like boiling liquid. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • boil — ‘large spot’ [OE] and boil ‘vaporize with heat’ [13] are distinct words. The former comes from Old English byl or byle, which became bile in Middle English; the change to boil started in the 15th century, perhaps from association with the verb.… …   Word origins

  • boil — [n] blister abscess, blain, blister, carbuncle, excrescence, furuncle, pimple, pustule, sore, tumor, ulcer; concept 309 boil [v1] heat to bubbling agitate, bubble, churn, coddle, cook, decoct, effervesce, evaporate, fizz, foam, froth, parboil,… …   New thesaurus

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